Simple app that needs some Geodesics knowledge - Earth Cubic Spacetimestamp (ECS)
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We need a javascript app - to be made open source with MIT license - that converts GPS coordinates into ECS and vice versa. I would pay up to £150 for it right now. Is simple, you input GPS coordinates and see the 22 digits cube number, and vice versa. Simple. Needs to be extremely accurate, namely with the exact point to be the center of the ECS matrix of cubes, the most accurate center of mass of Earth.
ECS stands for Earth Cubic Spacetimestamp and is described in bitcointalk forum by [i]remotemass[/i]

Hello, is it this link that you want to refer ? It is currently down for the moment :( https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=141141.0
kerncy 6 years ago
Please post the detail of ECS, and what geoid did you want used for the GPS mapping?
elwood 6 years ago
ECS seems a bit weird to say the least, is it absolutely necessary? There are other coordinate systems that can provide as much (or even more) precision in 3D space, using less digits - and even less characters if you expand your charset from numeric to alphanumeric.
alixaxel 6 years ago
awarded to MSF

Crowdsource coding tasks.

1 Solution


This is not a answer per se, just wanted to share my rationale to see if it checks out...


The first "level" of the matrix is clearly described as being:

9  2  3
8  1  4
7  6  5

The description for the second level however is a bit more ambiguous... By the description it's either:

24 25 10 11 12
23  9  2  3 13
22  8  1  4 14
21  7  6  5 15
20 19 18 17 16

Or, if we follow the spiral order:

25 10 11 12 13
24  9  2  3 14
23  8  1  4 15
22  7  6  5 16
21 20 19 18 17

The problem with this, if we kept adding levels, is that the resulting number of digits would be far bigger:

..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..
..  25  10  11  12  13  ..
..  24   9   2   3  14  ..
..  23   8   1   4  15  ..
..  22   7   6   5  16  ..
..  21  20  19  18  17  ..
..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..

Plus, we would have no way of knowing where to split a encoded ECS coordinate.


So, I'm assuming what @remotemass actually meant was something along these lines:

  1st         2nd         3rd         4th         5th         6th         7th         nth
-------     -------     -------     -------     -------     -------     -------     -------
9  2  3     9  2  3     9  2  3     9  2  3     9  2  3     9  2  3     9  2  3            
8  1  4  +  8  1  4  +  8  1  4  +  8  1  4  +  8  1  4  +  8  1  4  +  8  1  4  +    ...  
7  6  5     7  6  5     7  6  5     7  6  5     7  6  5     7  6  5     7  6  5            

Where + is concatenation and not the actual arithmetic operator of course. With this, Earth center would be:

1111111111111111111111:ttttttttttt

If the cube is 21 million meters³ and we have 22 spatial digits, that would mean that in a bound-free, addition-based model, each digit would account for ∛21000000m = 275.89m, if my math is not wrong. This yields:

275.89m * 22 = 6069.58m

This is way less than the 6370 km from sea-level to the core of the Earth, or the Earth radius of 6378.14 km.

If we wanted to cover 130km above sea-level, each digit would have to represent a change of 295.45km (kilometers, not meters!) in all 3 dimensions at once. Not very accurate, there are countries smaller than this.


Clearly, the addition-based bound-free model is not the answer. Perhaps if we consider a bounded model (say, 6500km to account for some altitude) and each following digits halves the previously halved value:

(6500km * 1000m) / 2²² = 1.55 meters³

Not bad, but each digit is still moving in 3 dimensions - this means that 6500km above the Earth core in the North Pole axis would need to be represented as 2222222222222222222222:ttttttttttt. Either I'm doing something very wrong here or this model is also flawed, because any coordinate that had 22 digits would inevitably locate you somewhere near the altitude of the ISS. If anyone cares to spot if / where this is wrong...

By @remotemass description, the matrix is 1-9 so it can't also be 3 dimensional (like the faces of a cube).


Now, I don't know why you want ECS specifically, but I tried doing something similar in 2-D once and after completing it, I realized that someone else had done it already: Natural Area Code System / Global Postal Code System, which are the same and inspired by the UTM coordinate system:

A Natural Area Code (NAC) can represent both an area or a location anywhere in the world. A two, four, > six, eight or ten character NAC represents respectively an area about 1000km X 700km (like a province), > 33km X 23km (like a city), one square kilometer (like a street block), 35m X 25m (like a building) or one
square meter anywhere in the world.

Using the 10 character NAC H5Q40 R48NV you can pin-point the tip of the Eiffel Tower. It's also possible to keep increasing the precision by adding one extra character to each of the segments. Similarly, it's also possible to extend to the 3rd dimension (altitude) and the fourth dimension (time) could work just like ECS.

Best of all, it's based on WGS-84 so it's easy(er) to convert between the two systems.

Bottom line, I share @Sukrim view: even pure WGS-84 would be shorter and have more precision than ECS.